elodieunderglass:

zoologicallyobsessed:

Ever Wondered How Emperor Penguins Survive in Temperatures of

−40°C

Their feathers are densely packed, and have in fact the highest contour feather destiny of any bird, allowing them to maintain a constant body temperature of 38°C in freezing waters. 

Depsite previous reports that filoplumes and plumules aka.downy feathers, are absent in penguins, new research has found the presence of both feathers in the penguin’s plumage. It was assumed before this that afterfeathers were the sole insulation

component in the penguin’s plumage. 

These downy feathers are about four times denser than the afterfeathers of the bird and play a key role in the insulation of penguins.

‘Hidden keys to survival: the type, density, pattern and functional role of emperor penguin body feathers’. Williams C, Hagelin J, Kooyman G. Proceedings of the Royal Society B.  21 October 2015. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.2033 

god there’s something horrid and fantastic about this dense, sinful slice of penguin. This feels like something that should be private. We should thank the penguins for the insight, and then we should gently replace that which we should not have witnessed. This knowledge has a heavy weight

linddzz:

why-animals-do-the-thing:

horreurscopes:

a few fun octopus facts:

  • their arms are similar to our tongues in that their muscle fibers are  oriented in three different directions 
  • octopuses are disconcertingly strong (anecdotal evidence says that a 15 inch wide octopus was as strong as the scientist handling it)
  • on that note that same scientist said that when her octopuses escaped she would have to run behind them, “like cats” (paraphrased from sy montgomery’s the soul of an octopus)
  • aquariums have “octopus enriching programs” so they don’t get bored and fuck shit up in their tanks
  • they are crazy smart like. really. really fucking smart 
  • but we can’t compare their intelligence to ours because our evolution branched from the same common ancestor so long ago we cannot comprehend how they think
  • it’s believed that their intelligence evolved when they lost their shell, and had to adapt to predict how countless of different prey and predators would act, how to avoid them, distract them, lure them or trick them 
  • they visualize how other creatures are going to act, which means they have have awareness that others are individuals which is a type of consciousness but i can’t remember what it’s called right now 
  • like, they use tools 
  • they have distinct personalities 
  • aquarium octopuses are socialized from a very young age and even though in the wild they are solitary creatures they become extremely friendly with enough human exposure
  • sometimes they dislike people for no apparent reason and will shoot water at them
  • they have three hearts 
  • each of their arms has a tiny brain that controls movement and sensory input on its own i shit you not
  • they are color blind and yet they can camouflage their color and nobody knows how 
  • they can change the color and texture of their skin faster than human eyes can keep up with it
  • great pacific octopuses are white when they are peaceful, and red when they’re excited 
  • aquarium octopus have escaped their tanks and slithered down pipes into the ocean 
  • escaped their tanks to eat the fish in other tanks 
  • escaped their tanks to go fight other octopuses cuz they were bored
  • octopus fight club
  • learned how to take photographs
  • cost thousands of dollars by flooding new floors
  • they can feel, taste, and smell with their suckers and all of their skin
  • they enjoy tasting their food by slowly moving it through their suckers instead of shoving it in their beaks
  • they can rewrite their rna. no, really

  • the only reason why they haven’t evolved to take over as the next dominant race is because they’re doing pretty well  in the ocean so there’s no need for them to adapt further 
  • there’s a ton more but i’m so overwhelmed by love i can’ think of any at the moment i’m going to cry
  • read the soul of an octopus by sy mongomery no she didn’t pay me i just love octopuses so much 

Also:

  • learned to shoot out the annoying light over the tank
  • hid in floor drains when caught out of their tanks by researchers
  • hid the shells of crabs stolen from a tank under a third, unrelated tank
  • Sy is a wonderful human and a great researcher. NEAq actually named a GPO after her in honor of all her work on octopuses. (Or octopi, or octopodes – they’re all correct). Definitely read that book. 

    -liked being splashed. Figured out that spitting water would have keepers splash back in response

    – learned to spray 45°F water everywhere to demand splashes

    -likes taking brushes from divers. Knows the best way to do this was to sneak up from underneath or reach over the shoulder

    -will wait until keepers are looking away/distracted to grab stuff and knows exactly how far to sink down to get out of reach

    -seriously octos are huge thieves. If you have something in your hand, they want it. As soon as they grab it, it belongs to them. There’s no food and they have no use for it? Doesn’t matter it’s their thing now.

    -we lost a magnet scrubber for three days because one stole it from the interns. Every time she let it go and we reached a net to get it, she would snatch it out of the net and drag it back into the den. By the time we got it back she had torn apart the scrub pad

    -honestly it’s like keeping an aquatic possessive 8-legged cat

    charliemitya:

    dangerbooze:

    langerdibs:

    dangerhamster:

    bundyspooks:

    In the late 19th century, an inexperienced doctor performed his first surgery n a room full of people. Feeling the pressure, he felt the need to perform the amputation in the quickest time possible, and ended up amputating his patient’s arm in the space of around 25 seconds. In the process of this, he accidentally amputated his assistant’s fingers too. Both patient and assistant died of sepsis, and a spectator died from shock, making it the only operation ever with a 300% mortality rate.

    how badly…can one person fuck up….

    THIS IS MY BOY!! THIS IS MY BOY ROBERT LISTON!! LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT HIM!!

    For starters, he practiced in a time before anesthesia was invented, when performing surgeries and amputations quickly were key to reducing a patients’ pain and upping their chance of survival. He was known as the ‘fastest knife on West End’ and could allegedly take a leg off in 2 ½ minutes. Some say he could amputate a limb in 30 seconds flat if he had to, he was exactly the man you wanted to call in case of emergency like this, because he could get you done and stitched nice and fast, before you bled out or died from shock.

    On top of that, he was a theater surgeon, and I mean, he brought the THEATER to it. This man would scream for the students watching him to time him, and when he had to free his hands, shove his BLOODY FUCKING KNIFE between his teeth. Also, the 300% mortality rate wasn’t because he was inexperienced- it was because he was WAY TOO ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT CUTTING ARMS OFF, swinging his knife around for the effect. This was not the only time his enthusiasm got the better of him on the table, once, he amputated a man’s leg and accidentally took off his testicles in the same go.

    He was, however, the first man to perform surgery with the use of anesthesia, and was a strong proponent of its use. He’s also famous for having UNSHAKABLE morals, he once got punched out a surgeon IN FRONT OF HIS WHOLE CLASS for displaying a woman’s corpse in a ‘voyeuristic’ manner, then straight-up took the body and had her decently buried (The woman was a murder victim and the surgeon he punched may have been complicit in the whole thing as well.).

    Liston is such a coolio figure in early medical history he fight he heal he knock people the fuck out.

    this post got a lot better

    this post is fucking metal.

    bogleech:

    superterrane:

    Nipponites

    Nipponites must have been so great

    Nobody has ANY idea how they lived. We just know they were ammonites with ridiculous twisty knots for shells that make no sense.

    One theory was even that they couldn’t move, but grew around something else and filtered plankton with their tentacles. Like maybe they grew in this “knot” throughout the body of a sponge or even embedded in rock. There’s a kind of snail that does this today!

    “worm snails”

    charliemitya:

    dangerbooze:

    langerdibs:

    dangerhamster:

    bundyspooks:

    In the late 19th century, an inexperienced doctor performed his first surgery n a room full of people. Feeling the pressure, he felt the need to perform the amputation in the quickest time possible, and ended up amputating his patient’s arm in the space of around 25 seconds. In the process of this, he accidentally amputated his assistant’s fingers too. Both patient and assistant died of sepsis, and a spectator died from shock, making it the only operation ever with a 300% mortality rate.

    how badly…can one person fuck up….

    THIS IS MY BOY!! THIS IS MY BOY ROBERT LISTON!! LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT HIM!!

    For starters, he practiced in a time before anesthesia was invented, when performing surgeries and amputations quickly were key to reducing a patients’ pain and upping their chance of survival. He was known as the ‘fastest knife on West End’ and could allegedly take a leg off in 2 ½ minutes. Some say he could amputate a limb in 30 seconds flat if he had to, he was exactly the man you wanted to call in case of emergency like this, because he could get you done and stitched nice and fast, before you bled out or died from shock.

    On top of that, he was a theater surgeon, and I mean, he brought the THEATER to it. This man would scream for the students watching him to time him, and when he had to free his hands, shove his BLOODY FUCKING KNIFE between his teeth. Also, the 300% mortality rate wasn’t because he was inexperienced- it was because he was WAY TOO ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT CUTTING ARMS OFF, swinging his knife around for the effect. This was not the only time his enthusiasm got the better of him on the table, once, he amputated a man’s leg and accidentally took off his testicles in the same go.

    He was, however, the first man to perform surgery with the use of anesthesia, and was a strong proponent of its use. He’s also famous for having UNSHAKABLE morals, he once got punched out a surgeon IN FRONT OF HIS WHOLE CLASS for displaying a woman’s corpse in a ‘voyeuristic’ manner, then straight-up took the body and had her decently buried (The woman was a murder victim and the surgeon he punched may have been complicit in the whole thing as well.).

    Liston is such a coolio figure in early medical history he fight he heal he knock people the fuck out.

    this post got a lot better

    this post is fucking metal.

    lifewithdeadbirds:

    On many of our skulls, you might notice there are small rings of bone in the eye sockets. These are sclerotic rings, and they’re found in many species of bird. It’s thought that these rings, which are also found in many species of reptiles, amphibians, and fish, can help stabilize an animal’s eyeballs. They may also help to keep particularly large eyeballs from straining themselves while the animal is trying to focus its sight on something.

    Photo credit: Mary Margaret Ferraro

    edge-of-existence-edge:

    The platypus was officlally classified as a mammal when it was discovered that it has mammary glands and it suckles its young.   However, much like the echidna, the platypus does not have nipples.  Instead, the milk flows from pores into grooves in the female’s abdomen, where the young can lap it up.

    Another oddity about young platypodes is that they are born with teeth.  Aside from the egg tooth, used to help the hatchlings pierce the shell of their eggs, the baby platypus has three teeth in each of its upper jaws, a premolar and two molars.  It is unknown why these teeth are present, as they drop out before the babies leave the breeding burrow and never grow back; the adult platypus has horny plates in its mouth to grind food, and also swallows gravel to aid with digestion.