bogleech:

superterrane:

Nipponites

Nipponites must have been so great

Nobody has ANY idea how they lived. We just know they were ammonites with ridiculous twisty knots for shells that make no sense.

One theory was even that they couldn’t move, but grew around something else and filtered plankton with their tentacles. Like maybe they grew in this “knot” throughout the body of a sponge or even embedded in rock. There’s a kind of snail that does this today!

“worm snails”

fossilstore:

A specimen crinoidea plate, of exception quality.Displaying six fully articulated crinoid crowns dancing on long segmented stems. These stems science theorises could have been as much as up to 50ft in length on giant types. Also included in this time capsule event is a ball-bowl or foothold, viewed at the upper left edge. This was the weight/float or root of this type of #crinoid, attached at the distal end of the stem/stalk the proximal stem end attached the crown (calyx). In the crown or head the arms covered in cilia pass the food to the mouth (situated at the top of the calyx), in the crown the anus is also situated.
A complex animal form dating back to the Devonian period. This type scientifically named as the #Scyphocrinites Elegans Crinoidea. The ‘Scyphocrinites #Elegans Crinoidea’ common name #fossil sea-lily, date back to the Paleozoic era, lower Devonian approximately 420 – 380 million years..
Although this type is #extinct, members of the Crinoidea ‘Phylum #Echinodermata’ family can still be seen in our oceans today. #fossil #fossilisation #extinctions #prehistoric #geo #natgeo #nature #ancientknowledge

rotwater:

strangebiology:

Panthera Atrox, Naegele’s Giant Jaguar, formerly called the “American Lion,” had very strange claws. Photographed at La Brea Tar Pits Page Museum.

i mentioned this elsewhere, but the “strange claws” are due to the original keratin sheaths (the actual claw as we know it) decomposing in the tar! keratin, whether it be in fingernails, hair, claws or beaks, doesn’t hold up as well as bone does.

so, in short: this is the bone under the nail and not the actual nail itself!

fossilstore:

Amazing spiny #emericiceras #barremense ammonite, found in the Atlas mountain ranges, cleaned and prepared for thefossilstore.com read more here…http://bit.ly/1P2sWlt #ammonites #fossils #naturalfossils #authenticatedfossils #genuinefossils #interiordesign #foss #geo #int #fasinating #science #naturalhistory #cretaceousperiod #extinct #prehistoric

rotwater:

strangebiology:

Panthera Atrox, Naegele’s Giant Jaguar, formerly called the “American Lion,” had very strange claws. Photographed at La Brea Tar Pits Page Museum.

i mentioned this elsewhere, but the “strange claws” are due to the original keratin sheaths (the actual claw as we know it) decomposing in the tar! keratin, whether it be in fingernails, hair, claws or beaks, doesn’t hold up as well as bone does.

so, in short: this is the bone under the nail and not the actual nail itself!

specios:

A few skeletal details from a ichthyosaur specimen at the Natural History Museum. They were large marine reptiles that lived from the  Early Triassic period to the Late Cretaceous period. Their name is Greek and translates to “fish lizard”. Ichthyosaur species varied from one to over sixteen metres in length but were generally shaped like modern dolphins and probably filled the same ecological niche.

Although ichthyosaur vertebrae are quite common, the first fossil which showed the ichthyosaur’s shape was found by Mary Anning (1799–1847); she was an early British fossil collector, dealer and palaeontologist. Many of her specimens can be seen in the museum – this was just one of them.

thebrainscoop:

😁❤️ I am so excited to film another episode about early mammal evolution on MONDAY! I love my job because it helps me learn about and appreciate so many things I never considered before. I’m so grateful. Seeing this guy makes me happy. #dimetrodon #isnotadinosaur (at The Field Museum)